SBSE Retreat 2003

Aug
11
2003
Mon, Aug 11 - Fri, Aug 15
Waycross Conference Center Morgantown, Indiana (Near Columbus, Indiana)

Architecture as Pedagogy

SBSEers on the deck at Waycross

The 2003 summer retreat of the Society of Building Science Educators will be held this year in the heart of the Midwest, and will take advantage of access to the signature architecture of nearby Columbus, Indiana.  This SBSE Retreat will mark the 20th [actually the 18th–ed.] such summer gathering of SBSE members and once again will focus on the purposeful exchange of academic and professional understandings of current issues in teaching of building science in schools of architecture and allied fields.  The program coordinator is Professor Leonard Bachman from the University of Houston; site logistics and local arrangements are being coordinated by staff at the Center for Energy Research/Education/Service (CERES) at Ball State University.
A special one-day excursion to the city of Columbus, Indiana has been built into this retreat enabling participants to see firsthand more than 65 executed works of signature architecture.  Although participants will not formally engage in a tool-day reconnaissance event in Columbus, instrument packages will be available for instantaneous spot measurements during the scheduled facility tours.  Included in this visit will be interviews with key personnel in the Columbus Architecture Center covering the history of the Cummins Engine Foundation support for the public commissioning of internationally recognized professionals in the design of these many Columbus landmarks.  This opportunity will be linked to the theme of the 2003 Retreat.

More specifically, the 2003 Retreat will focus on the relationships between the messages we deliver about buildings and the buildings from which we deliver those messages. Our conversation will revolve around the manifestations of architectural and environmental wisdom in buildings where the lessons are explicit and demonstrable.

The retreat will be organized around four themes and roundtable discussions:

  • Teaching Facilities—What environmental attitudes are communicated by the places where you teach? Are there connections and rifts between the lessons and the teaching/learning environment? What do students learn about the veracity of our lessons from these places?
  • Greening the Campus—At the village scale, how are campuses acting to form patches of green infrastructure in the overall network of cities?
  • Typology for Environmental Study Centers—How does “design for design” in the mode of environmental design for environmental centers translate into architecture as pedagogy?
  • Case Studies in Architecture as Pedagogy—What exemplar works can we refer to when examining buildings and the pedagogical elements of their design?
  • Roundtable Discussions—Suggest a personal “hot topic” to gather perspectives from your SBSE colleagues in an informal setting.

Event Coordination

Program Coordinator 
Leonard Bachman, University of Houston

Site Coordinator
Bob Koester, Ball State University

Venue

Waycross Center is located near the architectural "mini-Mecca" of Columbus, Indiana.
Columbus has been referred to as "Athens on the Prairie". 

In addition to camping facilities, Waycross offers summer conference facilities for groups and spiritual retreats for small groups and individuals at two separate locations. The Waycross office is located at the conference center, and camp meals are prepared in the center's kitchen. Waycross serves camp, retreat, and conference groups year around in addition to a regular summer program.

Waycross Conference Center is in a private location on 410 acres of woods, hills and streams and offers a tranquil setting, away from everyday life.

Spacious overnight accommodations for up to 64 people in 32 semi-private rooms with baths.

Seven meeting rooms of varying sizes.

Three meals per day are included 

Call for Submissions

The 2003 SBSE Summer Retreat theme is Architecture as Pedagogy. This topic focuses on relationships between the messages we deliver about buildings and the buildings we deliver the messages from. We take the Lewis Center for Environmental Studies at Oberlin College as a natural and handy example based on the philosophy of its director, David Orr. Our conversation will revolve around the manifestations of architectural and environmental wisdom in buildings where the lessons are acted out in explicit and instructional ways. See David Orr's article, "Architecture as Pedagogy II".

SESSION THEMES

Session 1:  Teaching and the Facilities it Happens In

What environmental attitudes are communicated by the places where you teach? What are the connections and rifts between the lessons and the teaching/learning environment? What do students learn about the veracity of our lessons from the examples of these places?
Connections and reinforcement of lessons
Rifts and dissonance

Session 2:  Greening the Campus

At the village scale, how are campuses acting to form patches of green infrastructure in the overall network of cities?

Greening the Campus: http://www.tulane.edu/~greenclb/thesis/chapter1.pdf
How does the footprint of your campus connect to other green patches in the city such as parks, bicycle routes, and public transportation nodes? Bring a color-coded map to share.

Session 3:  Design Typologies for Environmental Study Centers

How does "design for design" in the mode of environmental design for environmental centers translate into architecture as pedagogy?

Typological elements and their symbolic impact
Invisible technologies made visible
Metering, automation, and other data display

Session 4:  Case Studies in Architecture as Pedagogy

Aside from the Oberlin CES and the Florida A&M College of Architecture facilities, what other exemplar works can we refer to when examining buildings and the pedagogical elements of their design?

Discuss at least two case study examples that you personally favor.
Distribute a list of references on each building.

Roundtable Discussions

Everyone will bring a personal "hot topic" from their last year's experience to share.  This might have some interest for new directions to pursue, teaching strategies and projects, or whatever happened outside of the ordinary since the last retreat.

Submission Details

Everyone will contribute to this year's retreat by presenting a specific issue in one or more of the sessions.  To be included in the retreat, all respondents are asked to submit a one-page proposal to present in one (or more) of the four themed sessions.  These proposals should include a write-up of specific issues to be discussed and the questions or issues that will fuel discussion.  The keynote leader for each session and sequence of other presentations will be determined from the proposals.

In addition, everyone should be prepared to bring a personal "hot topic" from their last year's experience to share.  This might have some interest for new directions to pursue, teaching strategies and projects, or whatever happened outside of the ordinary since the last retreat.

Respondents should submit the following items:

  • Presentation proposal(s), one-page each - please identify desired session(s)

  • Contact information

Materials may be submitted electronically to lbachman@uh.edu

Hard copy materials should be submitted to:

Leonard Bachman
University of Houston
Architecture 122
Houston, TX  77204

Submission Deadline:  Monday, 3 March 2003, Midnight EST

Notification of the semi-final-agenda will be sent by email and posted to the SBSE listserver and retreat website around 15 April 2003.

Successful respondents, once notified, must then register for the retreat.

AttachmentSize
PDF icon Retreat registration form126.46 KB

Registration

Note that only respondents who have been notified of acceptance are eligible to register (click here for submission information).  Additionally, to register for and participate in the retreat, you will need to have paid your membership dues ($25 or $15 for students) prior to or at the time of registration. 
Click here to see if you are current on your dues.

Cost:
The registration fee is $350.00 for SBSE members.  Student scholarship recipients pay a registration fee of  $25.00. 
The registration fee covers three meals a day and accommodation in a double occupancy room for the full four nights of the five-day retreat. Local transportation costs as well as the trip/tour/banquet in Columbus are included in the fee.  Pro-rated cost scenarios have been developed if you wish to bring your spouse or significant other.  Please check the registration form for details.  The retreat venue offers opportunities for outdoor activities.

Registration Form:
Each SBSE participant must submit a registration form and a credit card payment or check made payable to Ball State University. Details of submission are contained on the form.  Spouses, friends and other guests of the participant do not need to fill out a separate form, but should be included in the registration form and payment.

The registration form is a portable document format file (.pdf).  Please print, fill out and submit the completed form along with your payment.

2003sbseregform.pdf  (127 KB file size)

Registration Deadline:  30 May 2003.

Questions or comments about the registration form or process should be directed to the SBSE 2003 Retreat Site Logistics Coordinator:

Robert J. Koester 
CERES  AB 018
Ball State University
Muncie, IN  47306
Phone: 765-285-1135
Fax: 765-285-5622
Email:  rkoester@bsu.edu

Schedule

Monday, August 11

MORNING               Travel and Check-in

12:00 PM                Lunch (12 to 1)

Lunch will be served for those arriving early.

AFTERNOON         Travel and Check-in  

5:00 PM                   Welcome, Intros and Logistics (Room-A)

A brief welcome and orientation by your Program Coordinator, Site Logistics Coordinator and Waycross Staff.

6:00 PM                  Dinner  

7:40 PM                   Green Quilt and Omiyage; Social Time (Room-A)

Green Quilt:  In keeping with our theme, the idea is to bring an 8.5 x 11 map of your city  (adopted, born, or otherwise) portraying its green features: natural, technical, societal, historical,  or other... including parkways, bicycle trails, institutions supporting the environment, and so on.   Give us an idea of a patchwork of green things that make a quilt in your city or town.  Bring 42 copies to pass out and briefly describe while you introduce yourself. Let's invent a geography.
                                                --AND/OR--

Omiyage:  SBSE has a tradition of exchanging teaching "omiyage" (gifts) at the evening program.  Please bring a favorite teaching aid in sufficient quantity for all participants (42), to the Teaching Exchange during our first evening program on August 11. Past favors have included a portable sundial from Cris Benton, HVAC design shareware from Eric Angevine, cool lighting slides from Barbara Erwine, Energy Scheming baseball caps from G. Z. Brown's team, textbooks from Amana Miller at Wiley, a pocket balometer from Troy Peters, Bring cool stuff to share!

EVENING                Social Time

Tuesday, August 12
 

8:00 AM                  Breakfast  

9:00 AM                  Teaching Facilities as Pedagogy (Concurrent Session 1 - Room-A)

What environmental attitudes are communicated by the places where you teach? What are the connections and rifts between the lessons and the teaching/learning environment? What do students learn about the veracity of our lessons from the examples of these places? 

- Connections and reinforcement of lessons
- Rifts and dissonance  

9:20 AM Presentation -

"The New UNM School of Architecture Building Project"
                Stephen Dent, University of New Mexico

9:40 AM Presentation –

"The Lewis Center for Environmental Studies: Buildings as             Ecological Systems"
                Michael Murray, Oberlin College

10:00 AM Presentation -

" M.D. Anderson School of Nursing, LEED Platinum in Houston "
                Leonard Bachman, University of Houston  

10:20 AM Presentation –

"Design Issues"
                Jim Wright, Southern Illinois University

 

9:00 AM                  Greening the Campus  (Concurrent Session 2 - Room-C)

At the village scale, how are campuses acting to form patches of green infrastructure in the overall network of cities?

- Greening the Campus: http://www.tulane.edu/~greenclb/thesis/chapter1.pdf
- How does the footprint of your campus connect to other green patches in the city such as parks, bicycle routes, and public transportation nodes? 

Bring a color-coded map to share.                 

9:20 AM Presentation -

"Greening the Campus"
                Jim Wasley, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee  

9:40 AM Presentation –

"BSU Council on the Environment"
                 Robert Koester, Ball State University

10:00 AM Presentation -

"Techion, a New Campus"
                Marc Schiler, University of Southern California

10:20 AM Presentation –

                "HK Products Exhibit"
                                Ming Ho, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

11:00 AM                Concept Mapping – Sessions 1 and 2 Breakout Groups
We will be forming ad hoc groups of five or six from the participants of each theme session. Each group will construct a concept map of the theme based on their interpretation of the presentations.   Presenters should be excused from making the concept maps for the theme they presented in, but should be available for questions.

For the concept maps (entity diagrams, flow charts, information maps, concept maps, mind maps or what have you) we will supply poster pads for the canvas, a selection of large post-it notes (in varied size and color) for each of the groups to use as movable entities, and colored markers for labels and relationship connections between the entities.

More information about Concept Mapping can be found:

Overviewanduses
http://www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed407938.html

Cognitive tools map tool demo software

Concept mapping (linked from trochim) 
http://trochim.human.cornell.edu/research/epp1/epp1.htm

Concept mapping soft science or hard art

Entity Relationship Diagrams 
http://www.smartdraw.com/resources/centers/software/erd.htm

Excel “Autoshapes” for drawing concept maps and other diagrams http://www.iup.edu/HELPDESK/TRAINING/HANDOUTS/EXC2.doc

Free mapping software and tutorials 
http://cmap.coginst.uwf.edu/

Home – map your mind - books, software and mind mapping techniques

How to mind amp buzan centers

Mind mapping examples submitted by others

Smartdraw for flowcharts, org charts, forms and business presentations

The literary machine tutorials and free download

Using note cards, post-it notes or software techniques, 
ideas and examples: http://dmc.umn.edu/guides/diagrams.shtml

What is concept mapping? 
http://trochim.human.cornell.edu/tutorial/katsumot/conmap.htm

11:40 AM                Sessions 1 and 2 Pin-up Maps
After the breakout, the concept maps will all be hung before lunch (incentive to finish).

12:00 PM                Lunch

1:20 PM                   Crossover reviews of Concept Maps from Session 1 Groups and Session 2 Groups (Room-A)
After lunch we will meet in grand assembly and each group will present their concept map for the benefit of all.  These maps will be retained and become the retreat artifact... possibly for publishing on the website (incentive to finish neatly).  

2:40 PM                  Break  

3:00 PM                   Learning From Buildings:  

                               Case Study Reports from the Agents of Change Project (Room-A)

Through the FIPSE-funded Agents of Change project, faculty and teaching assistants from accredited architecture programs will be trained to investigate the secret life of actual buildings.  This year, teams of faculty and students participating in the Agents of Change Training Sessions at the Water Pollution Control Laboratory in Portland  Oregon (January) and the Lewis Center for Environmental Studies in Oberlin, Ohio (August), will share key findings and design lessons learned from their investigations. Topics will include reports presented by teams on daylighting, electric lighting, occupant comfort, thermal zoning and building envelope design. Teams will discuss design lessons learned and offer insight into how case studies will influence their own design work.  In addition to a question/answer period, participants in this session are encouraged to discuss ways to implement the approach at home institutions through seminars, studios, workshops and Tool Days.  

5:00 PM                  Social Time  

6:00 PM                  Dinner  

EVENING                Social Time

Wednesday, August 13

 

6:40 AM                  Breakfast  

7:40 AM                  Load Bus  

8:00 AM                  Departure:  Charter Bus Travel to Columbus  

9:00 AM                   Video: Columbus Visitors Center

A short video presentation telling the history and story of the architecture of Columbus , Indiana .

9:20 AM                  Interview: First Christian Church

Building tour and interview with, Nolan Bingham, the architect for the recent addition to Eliel Saarinen's 1942 church design.  

10:00 AM                 Columbus : Guided Downtown Walking Tour
Walking tour of signature buildings in the immediate vicinity of downtown and Columbus Visitor's Center.  We will be divided into two groups and will be guided by highly trained and articulate tour staff from the Visitor's Center.               

12:00 PM                 Box Lunch: Mill Race Park
A box lunch will be provided by Waycross Center .  There is also the opportunity for ice cream and other treats (including a performance by a 1908 nickelodeon) at nearby Zaharako's.  

2:00 PM                  Columbus:  Guided Bus Tour / Building Visits
A motor coach tour with Visitor's Center tour guide to signature architectural sites throughout the city with walk-off interior visits to selected daylit buildings.  

4:00 PM                   Columbus : Free Exploration Time  

5:20 PM                  Banquet: Smith’s Row Food and Spirits
A delicious meal at one of the area's finest restaurants followed by a presentation by Bob Stewart, a former Mayor of the City of Columbus.
The presentation will discuss the non-bricks-and-mortar impacts of the 'Story of Columbus'.  These include effects upon community, economic, and societal development as well the many spin-offs from national/international linkages resulting from the Columbus signature architecture program.  In a way, this is a presentation on  'Architecture as Pedagogy' for an entire community. 

7:40 PM                  Departure:  Charter Bus Travel to Waycross  

EVENING                 Social Time  

Thursday, August 14

 

8:00 AM                  Breakfast  

9:00 AM                  Design Typologies for Env. Study Centers  
                                              (Concurrent Session 3 - Room-A)

How does "design for design" in the mode of environmental design for environmental centers translate into architecture as pedagogy?
                -Typological elements and their symbolic impact
                -Invisible technologies made visible
                -Metering, automation, and other data display  

9:20 AM Presentation -

"The Phillip Merril Environmental Center"
                Carl Bovill, University of Maryland

9:40 AM Presentation –

"Energy Xchange"
                Michael Ermann, Virginia Tech

10:00 AM Presentation –

"The Photovoltaics Design Lab"
                 Emad M. Afifi, Savannah College of Art and Design

9:00 AM                  Case Studies in Architecture as Pedagogy I  
                                               (Concurrent Session 4 - Room-B)

In addition to the Oberlin CES and the Florida A&M College of Architecture facilities, what other exemplar works can we refer to when examining buildings and the pedagogical elements of their design?

                                                                -Discuss at least two case studies that you personally favor.
                                                                -Distribute a list of references on each building.               

9:20 AM Presentation -

"Tool Day at Arup: Teaching in the Office"
                Bruce Haglund, University of Idaho

9:40 AM Presentation –

"Using LEED as a Benchmark for Sustainable Case Studies"
                Terri Meyer-Boake, University of Waterloo

10:00 AM Presentation -

"UT Austin and the Solar Decathelon" 
                David Crutchfield and Rebecca Leibowitz, University of Texas

11:00 AM                 Concept Mapping – Sessions 3 and 4 Breakout Groups
Please refer to Tuesday’s schedule for the description and mechanics of this session.

11:40 AM                Sessions 3 and 4 Pin-up Maps
After the breakout, the concept maps will all be hung before lunch (incentive to finish).

12:00 PM                Lunch

1:20 PM                   Crossover reviews of Concept Maps from Session 3 Groups and Session 4 Groups (Room-A)
After lunch we will meet in grand assembly and each group will present their concept map for the benefit of all.  These maps will be retained and become the retreat artifact... possibly for publishing on the website (incentive to finish neatly).  

2:40 PM                  Break

3:00 PM                  Case Studies in Architecture as Pedagogy II  (Session 5 - Room-A)

In addition to the Oberlin CES and the Florida A&M College of Architecture facilities, what other exemplar works can we refer to when examining buildings and the pedagogical elements of their design?

                                                                -Discuss at least two case studies that you personally favor.
                                                                -Distribute a list of references on each building.               

3:20 PM Presentation –

"Case Study"
                Diane Armpriest, University of Idaho

3:40 PM  Presentation -

"Integrated Design"
                David Ogoli, Judson College

4:00 PM  Presentation –  (Room-B-C)

                "Sun Emulator Case Studies"
                                Norbert Lechner, Auburn University  

5:00 PM                  Roundtable Discussion:  
                                                Mentoring the Next Generation of Teachers (Room-A)

SBSE faculty will offer perspectives to students interested in careers in teaching. What qualifications are schools looking for? What are the expectations for teaching and research? Should one be a licensed architect or have a Ph.D. before applying? What salary ranges and start up money can one expect? What are the critical teaching materials to have when starting off?

This is an informal session with faculty who will offer perspectives on the job market. Students (and faculty) may bring questions or simply come and listen to discussion. The roundtable discussion will serve as a critique time for individuals interested in pursuing a career in teaching, teaching philosophies, and strategies for entering the job market. Bring a resume or teaching portfolio!  

6:00 PM                  Dinner  

EVENING                Social Time  

Friday, August 15

 

8:00 AM                  Breakfast  

9:00 AM                  Final Review and Pin-up / Check-out as required (Room-A)

12:00 PM                 Lunch (12 to 1)

Lunch will be served for those departing late.

AFTERNOON            Check-out and Travel

Participants

Afifi,    Emad—Savannah College of Art & Design    252 Cherry    eafifi@scad.edu 
Armpriest,    Diane—University of Idaho    205 Oak    dianea@uidaho.edu
Bachman,    Leonard—University of Houston    106 Oak    Lbachman@uh.edu
Bash,    Kathy—University of Oregon    104 Oak    kbash@darkwing.uoregon.edu
Bovill,    Carl—University of Maryland    254 Cherry    cb116@umail.umd.edu
Crutchfield,    David—University of Texas    255 Cherry    archdave@mail.utexas.edu
Culp,    Jeff—Ball State University    101 Oak    jculp@bsu.edu
Dent,    Stephen—University of New Mexico    106 Oak    sddent@unm.edu
Ermann,    Michael—Virginia Tech    103 Oak    mermann@vt.edu
Fife,    Lizette—University of Idaho    203 Oak    lizette@moscow.com
Fisher,    Robert—Ball State University    201 Oak    rfisher@bsu.edu
Grondzik,    Walter—Florida A&M University    204 Oak    gzik@polaris.net
Haglund,    Bruce—University of Idaho    204 Oak    bhaglund@uidaho.edu
Ho,    Ming—The Hong Kong Polytechnic University    102 Oak    bemingho@polyu.edu.hk
Janda,    Katy—Oberlin College    203 Oak    kjanda@oberlin.edu
Kasper,    Heidi—University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee    205 Oak    hdkasper@uwm.edu
Koester,    Robert—Ball State University    251 Cherry    rkoester@bsu.edu
Kwok,    Alison—University of Oregon    104 Oak    akwok@aaa.uoregon.edu
Lechner,    Norbert—Auburn University    201 Oak    lechnnm@auburn.edu
Leibowitz,    Rebecca—University of Texas    253 Cherry    moon.moon@mail.utexas.edu
Macias,    Rita—Ball State University    207 Oak    ymaciasm@yahoo.com
Matt,    Angela—University of Oregon    207 Oak    atmatt@pacbell.net
Meyer-Boake,    Terri—University of Waterloo    107 Oak    tboake@sympatico.com
Mitchell,    Amanda—University of British Columbia    107 Oak    amitchel@interchange.ubc.ca
Murray,    Michael—Oberlin College    252 Cherry    Michael.Murray@oberlin.edu
Ogoli,    David—Judson College    103 Oak    dogoli@judsoncollege.edu
Ota,    Roger—University of Oregon    255 Cherry    rota@darkwing.uoregon.edu
Peffer,    Therese—University of California, Berkeley    105 Oak    tpeffer@uclink.berkeley.edu
Peters,    Troy—University of Oregon    256 Cherry    tpeters@darkwing.uoregon.edu
Sandifer,    Steve—University of California, Los Angeles    102 Oak    ssandife@ucla.edu
Schiler,    Marc—University of Southern California    254 Cherry    marcs@usc.edu
Sethi,    Amarpreet—Arizona State University    253 Cherry    sethi@asu.edu; amarpreet_s@hotmail.com
Sharag-Eldin,    Adil—Kent State University    202 Oak    amsharag@saed.kent.edu
Simon,    Keith—University of Oregon    256 Cherry    ksimon@darkwing.uoregon.edu
Wasley,    Jim—University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee    258 Cherry    jwasley@uwm.edu
Wright,    Jim—Southern Illinois University    258 Cherry    jkwright@siu.edu